3 Tips for Choosing a Tie To Complement Your Suit

Neckties don’t take up much room in our closets, but they make (or break) the outfits we pair them with. They may be the smallest item in our wardrobe, but they are the most noticeable component of a suit. Bearing that in mind, it’s important to know what you’re looking for when it’s time to buy a new tie.

Here are 3 things to look for as you start your search:

Fabric:
Silk has always been the standard for quality ties that hold their shape and stay in style. Its smooth, soft veneer resists wrinkles and the build-up of dust over time. Its durability allows the tie to hold its shape even when tied in several different knots over the years. 

Cotton is another standard fabric that remains in fashion year in and year out. Cotton ties are a lower-priced alternative to silk, providing a sharp look that’s also practical. Knotty Tie has great quality cotton ties in custom prints. 

Construction: 
There are a few key elements to consider if you want a tie that will keep its cut and look over the years. The first is the blade, or the large end at the bottom. Flip it over and check to see if the edges look folded or rolled (or ask a sales associate.) Folded edges look nice at first tend to wear and loosen with age. A quality tie will have rolled, pressed edges for a fuller appearance and greater longevity.

Style: 
Keep the width of the tie’s blade in proportion to the lapels on your blazer. Nothing looks more awkward than a suit with a thin lapel with a wide tie, or vice-versa. Make sure the pattern of the tie is square with the cut. In other words, hold the tie up in front of you and check if the pattern flows from edge to edge or if it looks uneven. Inspect the cut of the blade and make sure the edges are at a 45-degree angle. Other angles have come and gone over the years, but the classic diagonal edge has never gone out of fashion. 

Bonus:
You should always give the tie a careful once-over to see it doesn’t have any imperfections or blemishes, however slight. One dropped stitch can ruin a good tie after only a couple of uses.

Hopefully you’re now feeling better-equipped to inject some color and flair to your suit collection. Remember that your tie is the most-noticeable piece of your ensemble, so don’t skimp on quality and take your time picking each one out.

Have any of your own tips on ties? Who taught you to tie your favorite knot? Respond in the comments and give us your take on ties.